What are the Options for Patching Hardwood Floor for a Remodel?

Bedford, NH Homeowner is Looking for Advice

Hardwood Flooring Armstrong

Remodeling and keeping the existing flooring can present some unique challenges.  Depending on how the floor was originally installed, if fixtures and the layout of the room are being changed you may be left with some areas where the existing flooring does not match what is underneath.  In this scenario, you can either sand down the entire floor and refinish it, placing new boards to cover the missing area, or simply patch the floor that does not reflect the current hardwood and color match the new wood as best as possible.

A homeowner in Bedford was taking on a significant kitchen remodel, changing the layout of his kitchen counter and island.  Removing these fixtures, he discovered that the flooring underneath the existing island did not match the hardwood floor.  Curious about his options, he contacted the experts at Cardoza Flooring.

Installing Hardwood Boards to Patch the Floor

The easiest option in this scenario is to cut and install similar hardwood floor to cover this area of the floor.  The wood will need to be as closely matched to the existing floor as possible.  The new boards can then be stained to color match the existing floor.  Keep in mind that initially the color will not be a perfect match, as the new boards will need to be exposed to foot traffic and normal wear over time.  In a month or two a properly done job should not stand out and over the course of a year you will hardly be able to distinguish the area that was patched.

Refinishing the Floors Can Offer the Exact Match

Much more in depth, the homeowner can opt to refinish the entire floor, installing boards in the area that needs to be patched.  By refinishing, the color and top layer is stripped from the entire floor.  Then there is no need to precisely color match the new boards, as the entire room will be re-stained and finished to match.

The homeowner in Bedford opted for the easier, and less expensive, option to patch the exposed section of the floor that did not have hardwood.  The color was able to be matched closely and the differences go unnoticed by visitors to the home.